Posts Tagged Galaxy

Samsung Galaxy Grand Announced

Samsung has added another fine addition to it’s line of Smartphone after it unveiled the Samsung Galaxy Grand! The phone will have a huge 5” display and will run on Android 4.1.2 Jelly Bean OS. It will be powered by a dual core 1.2 GHz processor and will have a brilliant 8 MP rear camera. The phone will also have an identical dual SIM model! Although the release dates have not yet been disclosed, this phone will definitely be worth the wait!

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Review: Samsung Galaxy Beam

Cost: Rs 29, 990

Rating: * * * *

Specifications: 1Ghz dual-core, 768MB RAM, 8GB + microSD, 4-inch touchscreen (800 x 480), 5MP rear/1.3MP front cam, Android 2.3, 145 grams

Positives: High-quality LED projector and decent Android smartphone in a not-too-bulky casing

Negatives: No tripod or stand included, sound doesn’t match the requirements, no cap for projector lens

NEW DELHI: A smartphone’s screen is way too small when you want to share a video or photo with friends. That’s why fitting a pico projector into a phone has been tried so many times with varying degrees of success.

The problem is that doing this considerably increases bulk and noticeably decreases battery life. Plus, all the projector phones available so far have been feature phones — not based on a smartphone operating system. The LED-based projection system has so far been more of a gimmick rather than a usable feature.

The Galaxy Beam is different though. It is India’s first smartphone with built in projector. Right at the outset, we think that the Beam is a good attempt at keeping things simple, attractive and making it perfectly usable as a day-to-day phone. That the projection quality is impressive is just icing on the cake.
Full Coverage on Apple’s new iPhone Look at it from the side and you won’t be able to tell that there’s a projector in there. The projector lens is on top of the phone, covered by a glass panel (but there is no lens cap). It has a total brightness of 15 lumens and a resolution of 640 x 360 pixels. These numbers may not seem that impressive, but you need to consider that we’re talking about a phone that weighs just 145 grams and is just 12.5mm thick. Under the right conditions (with low ambient lighting and with a flat white surface), the phone can project an image up to 50-inchs in size (diagonal size). Interestingly, the projector can also double up as a flashlight — one that projects a perfectly rectangular lightbeam and in your choice of colour.

To start the projector up, you need to press the dedicated button on the side of the phone. It starts up almost immediately and you can proceed to adjust the various settings, starting with the focus and orientation (landscape or portrait).

A nice bedside stand is included in the box, which also serves as a charger for an additional battery. The battery life when using it as a phone is roughly a day or two. Running it solely as a projector, you should get about three and a half hours of use.

Two of our main complaints with the Beam are that it does not come with a stand, tripod or mount of any kind for projector use. You’ll have to figure out a way to prop it up to get the ideal height and angle to display on a wall. And secondly, the loudspeaker is far too feeble to be of any use when you’re using it as a projector. To use it with multimedia, you will necessarily need some sort of external powered speaker system (either a wired or Blueooth speaker will do).

It boils down to this — as a phone, you’re not getting the best spec there is — but it is the best projector phone out there. If you prefer to keep things separate, you could get a standalone projector like 3M’s MP180 (Rs 29,990) which can project videos or photos from internal memory or micro SD card and a separate Android smartphone.

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External device causes smartphone fire: Samsung

SEOUL: Samsung Electronics Co on Saturday cited a report by fire investigators as saying an external energy source had caused one of its flagship Galaxy S III smartphones to catch fire in Ireland last month.

The world’s top smartphone maker said an investigation by Fire Investigations (UK) had stated that the Samsung device was not responsible for the cause of the fire, and that an “external energy source was responsible for generating the heat”.

The new Galaxy S series, the strongest rival for Apple’s iPhone, was launched in Europe in late May and in the United States last month.

A Dublin-based consumer posted comments and photos on a web site in June, saying his Galaxy phone had “exploded” while mounted on his car dashboard.

He wrote that while he was driving, “suddenly a white flame, sparks and a bang came out of the phone.”

The South Korean electronics giant said it had contracted FI-UK, an independent British provider of consultancy services into fires and explosions, to determine the cause of the fire.

Samsung added it had provided FI-UK with several Galaxy S III phones, including the burnt smartphone, for a series of tests.

“Additionally, the investigation results state, ‘The only way it was possible to produce damage similarly to the damage recorded within the owner’s damaged device was to place the devices or component parts with a domestic microwave,'” Samsung said on its official global blog (http://global.samsungtomorrow.com/?p=16161).

It also showed the unnamed user’s latest comments posted on a web site, saying the phone had been recovered from water and the damage “occurred due to a large amount of external energy” which apparently was used to dry out the device.

“This was not a deliberate act but a stupid mistake,” the user added, according to the Samsung blog.

There have been other reports of Samsung smartphones overheating. In March, a Korean schoolboy reported that a spare battery for his Galaxy S II exploded in his back pocket. Samsung said then that the cause was massive external pressure or force.

Heat issues have been reported with other devices. In March, influential consumer watchdog Consumer Reports said Apple’s latest iPad tablet threw off a lot more heat than the previous version, lending weight to complaints on Internet forums that the device could get uncomfortably warm after heavy use.

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Samsung to fight block on sale of Galaxy Nexus

SEOUL: South Korea’s Samsung vowed on Saturday to “take all available measures” to fight a US court’s decision to block American sales of its Galaxy Nexus smartphones made in collaboration with Google.

US District Court Judge Lucy Koh on Friday granted Apple’s request for an injunction blocking US sales of the smartphone, a model that aims to challenge the iPhone.

“Samsung is disappointed, as the court’s ruling will restrict American consumer choice in the smartphone market,” said the world’s largest smartphone maker in a statement.

The company said it was working closely with Google to resolve the matter.

“Samsung will continue to take all available measures, including legal action, to ensure the Galaxy Nexus remains available to consumers,” it added.

Friday’s ruling was the second victory for California-based Apple this week in a fierce and complex patent war with the South Korean consumer electronics giant.

On Tuesday, the same judge barred the sale of Samsung’s new Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet computer, saying that Apple had presented “a strong case” for the injunction.

Both Galaxy devices are powered by Android operating software that Google makes available for free to gadget makers, and Nexus is the Mountain View, California-based technology company’s own branded line.

The injunction won’t go into effect until Apple posts a $95.6 million bond with the court, which would secure payment of damages to Samsung if it were to win the case.

Galaxy Nexus launched in the United States in April and Google gave the smartphones to developers at its annual conference in San Francisco this week as part of a “tool kit” to create applications for the Android mobile platform.

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Samsung Galaxy S III sales to hit 10 mn in July

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA: Samsung Electronics Co, the world’s top mobile phone maker, said on Monday that it expects global sales of the latest Galaxy smartphone to surpass 10 million in July even as it struggles to keep up with demand because of component shortages.

Shin Jong-kyun, president of Samsung’s mobile communications business, said the Galaxy S III will hit the 10-million milestone within two months of its launch.

“It has been tough to keep up with demand,” Shin told reporters.

Samsung’s failure to procure sufficient mobile components for its latest smartphone has stoked concerns that its second-quarter smartphone sales could be much lower than expected. Shin said the company expects to resolve the supply issues with mobile components sometime in the next week.

“Despite the tough economic situation in Europe and problems with supplying components for the Galaxy S III, the second-quarter earnings will be better than the first quarter,” he said.

Shares of Samsung tumbled 4.2 per centon the Seoul bourse on Monday, closing at a four-month low. The benchmark Kospi index fell 1.2 percent.

Samsung began sales of the Galaxy S III in Europe on May 29 and released it in the U.S. last week. In its home market, the company started sales of the latest iteration of Galaxy earlier Monday.

Samsung’s sales estimate for the S III reflects robust demand from mobile operators. Unlike Apple Inc., Samsung does not disclose sales figures to consumers.

The South Korean company said the S III will be released by around 300 mobile carriers in 147 countries by the end of July, aiming for an early start before rival Apple announces a new version of the iPhone in the third quarter.

The third version of the Galaxy S features a bigger screen _ measured 4.8-inch diagonally _ but is thinner and lighter than its predecessors and the iPhone 4S.

Samsung packed the high-end smartphone with a legion of new features including eye-recognition technology that keeps the screen from dimming. It also has voice command functions that let users schedule an alarm or adjust volume by speaking to their device.

Its near-field communication technology enables sharing of data heavy multimedia content among Galaxy S III users quickly. But activating the function _ called S Beam _ takes multiple steps.

Because Samsung customizes its flagship smartphone based on Google’s Android operating system, some of Samsung’s features overlap with those made by Google.

Separately, Samsung’s mobile president said it is still investigating the explosion of a Galaxy S III in Ireland. He said the battery wasn’t the cause.

Samsung overtook Nokia as the world’s biggest mobile-phone maker in 2011 and competes with Apple for the top smartphone maker position. It aims to double its smartphone sales this year to nearly 200 million phones.

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Samsung Galaxy strong contender to iPhone

NEW YORK: Until I started watching videos on Samsung’s new Galaxy S III phone, I never thought of the iPhone’s display as small.

The Galaxy’s screen measures 4.8 inches (12.2 centimeters)diagonally, compared with 3.5 inches (8.9 centimeters) for the iPhone. That translates to a display area that’s nearly twice the size. Yet the Galaxy is thinner and lighter.

Apart from that, the Galaxy shares the iPhone’s curvy and shiny design, along with a center button that wakes up the device from power-saving mode or takes you from whatever you’re doing to a home screen.

Unlike the iPhone, the Galaxy runs on faster 4G cellular networks (AT&T markets its iPhones as 4G, but the network is based on older technology). The Galaxy also comes with a new wireless technology called near-field communications, which can be used to share files and make purchases.

Pictures taken with the Galaxy were sharper and had better light balance than those with the iPhone, based on a handful of test shots I took. The Galaxy’s tool for measuring data usage _ for those of us no longer on unlimited plans, surpasses what comes with the iPhone.

All that makes the Galaxy a strong contender to Apple’s popular device.

I understand the comparison isn’t entirely fair. The iPhone 4S is about eight months old, and there’s a new model expected this fall. Last week, Apple previewed changes to the phone’s operating system, promising improvements to its Siri virtual assistant, a mapping service with voice navigation and more.

But the reality is the new Galaxy is available now _ not in September or October.

All four national wireless companies and regional carrier U.S. Cellular will sell the Galaxy, which runs the latest operating software from Google, a flavor of Android known as Ice Cream Sandwich.

The basic model with 16 gigabytes of memory will cost $200 with a two-year contract through AT&T, Verizon Wireless, Sprint and U.S. Cellular. That’s comparable to the iPhone’s $199. A 32 GB model will cost $250, which is cheaper than a comparable iPhone at $299. T-Mobile will charge at least $30 more than others, though it may still be cheaper overall with lower monthly data fees over two years.

The Galaxy phones will be available in white or blue. AT&T will also have a red version this summer, but it won’t carry the 32 GB model. Availability starts this week, though dates vary by wireless company.

Now back to Galaxy’s screen.

The Galaxy shines when displaying widescreen video. That’s because much of the display’s increase is in width rather than in height when the phone is held on its side, or landscape mode. The iPhone wastes some display real estate to make wider videos fit. There are unused strips of black above and below those videos.

When watching a foreign movie through a Netflix app, the Galaxy’s larger screen makes the subtitles much easier to read. I can read them fine on the iPhone, but my eyes kept zeroing in on the text to do so, making me miss the action.

The colors on the Galaxy also appeared richer, thanks to a screen that uses organic light-emitting diodes, rather than a standard LCD.

All that video can deplete your data allowance in no time.

On the iPhone, the tool for measuring data usage isn’t easy to find. You have to choose “General” in your settings, then “Usage,” and then “Cellular Usage.” There’s info there on the amount of data sent and received, but no total. You have to remember to manually reset the counter each month on the day your billing cycle starts.

On the Galaxy, “Data usage” is the third item from the top under “Settings.” You can tell the phone when to warn you that you’re about to reach your cap for the month. You can also automatically disable data usage when you’ve reached a pre-specified point to avoid extra charges. You don’t have to do any math to get the total used, and the counter automatically resets each month. You can also see which apps use the most data.

Before I go further, I’ll say a few things about where the iPhone still excels.

_ The iPhone has more software from outside parties, extending the device’s functionality. Many apps are written only for the iPhone and other Apple devices. Versions for the Galaxy and other Android phones sometimes come months later and lack all of the features.

_ The iPhone works better than Android devices in corporate settings. Android, for instance, lacks the tools needed to access Wi-Fi at my office or the corporate email system (though some might consider that a plus for Android).

_ The iPhone has Siri, the virtual assistant that hears your voice commands and talks back.

The Galaxy introduces a voice assistant, but she’s best described as Siri’s forgotten stepchild. The Galaxy couldn’t find an Indian restaurant just a block from me, and she gave me the name of a doctor when I asked for Thai restaurants. The Galaxy also lacks Siri’s attitude and sense of humor.

Me: “What is the best smartphone?” Siri: “Wait, there are other phones?”

The Galaxy replied with the grammatically incorrect and boring, “Opinion vary but I think Samsung Galaxy is the best of them all.”

Here’s where the Galaxy prevails:

_ As with other Android devices, the Galaxy syncs well with Google services. By signing into a Google account, names, emails and phone numbers from my Gmail contacts are automatically transferred to the phone. The same happens with calendar entries. Apple uses a separate contact and calendar system, not the one I already use through Google.

_ You can remove the plastic back cover to switch the battery or insert a microSD card for additional storage of up to 64 gigabytes. The iPhone’s battery can be replaced only by a technician, and there’s no slot for more storage.

_ Both devices have two cameras, including an 8 megapixel one in the back. The Galaxy’s front-facing camera does more than take pictures: When you’re reading something, the camera will see your eyes glued on the screen, so your phone won’t switch to power-saving mode. The iPhone’s screen will start to dim if you don’t touch it periodically.

_ If you’re texting a friend and find it easier to discuss something by phone, the Galaxy will automatically call that person when you put the phone by your ear.

_ When watching video stored on your device, there’s a “pop out” feature that lets you watch in a smaller window while doing other things such as email and Facebook on the phone.

_ The Galaxy’s near-field communications technology offers a preview of the future. One day, it could be common like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. With it, I’m able to share photos and video simply by tapping the backs of two Galaxy phones together. I’m also able to make purchases at a handful of stores by tapping the phone to the merchant’s NFC reader, as long as I have credit cards set up through the Google Wallet app.

Alas, Google Wallet isn’t so useful until more merchants accept it, and the app is only available on the Sprint model of the Galaxy.

Basic sharing features, which let you swap small files, work with some other late-model Android phones. If you tap two Galaxy phones together, you can quickly transfer really big files, such as videos and photos.

All Galaxy models except T-Mobile’s will be able to use so-called fourth-generation, or 4G, networks. T-Mobile doesn’t have a 4G network, but its 3G network is almost as fast as a 4G network (and indeed, it calls its network “4G”).

Current iPhones don’t work with 4G technology, though the AT&T version says it does because it uses an upgraded 3G network, much like T-Mobile’s. The iPhone coming this fall is likely to support “real” 4G, using a technology called LTE.

The next iPhone will also have an Apple-designed mapping service with turn-by-turn directions spoken aloud. It’s one of the rare instances where the iPhone will play catch-up to Android, which has had Google’s voice navigation app built-in since 2009.

If you’re an iPhone owner looking for a new phone, I’d wait a few months and make a comparison then.

If you’re an Android user looking to switch to an iPhone, the Galaxy offers enough reason to stick with Android. You’ll miss out on the cachet of owning an iPhone or the joys of chatting with Siri, but you’ll get a solid device with the latest technologies.

 

 

 

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Galaxy S3 named bestseller pre-ordered phone

LONDON: Samsung’s new Galaxy S3 phone has become the fastest selling-pre-order phone of the year, according to Europe’s largest independent mobile phone retailer Carphone Warehouse.

The retailer confirmed that thousands of customers have pre-ordered the new flagship Google Android device, The Telegraph reports. Over 800 Carphone shops will stock the phone during its launch, which will go on sale on May 29 to those who have pre-ordered it.

Graham Stapleton, Chief Commercial Officer at Carphone Warehouse, claimed, “Pre-order demand for the new Galaxy S3 has surpassed expectations since the handset was first unveiled two weeks ago. The first 24 hours alone saw thousands placing their pre-order at Carphone Warehouse.”

Earlier this week, it was reported that nine million S3s had been pre-ordered by more than 100 carriers.

Korean Samsung is the biggest mobile phone company in the world, ahead of long-time number one Nokia, and also the biggest maker of smartphones ahead of Apple.

The Galaxy S3 that was unveiled at an international launch held at London have innovative new features such as eye tracking so that the screen stays on while a user is looking at it.

The S3 also has a 4.8″ display, one of the largest in the market, and the ability to automatically initiate a call to a contact onscreen when the phone is held up to its user’s face.

Samsung has also announced that the device will be the official phone of the London Olympics.

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