Archive for June 24th, 2012

BREAKING: Mohammed Morsi is elected President in Egypt’s first free election

Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsi has been elected president of Egypt in the country’s first free election, the election commission declared Sunday.

Leave a comment

Deal: $50 gift card with 4GB 360 Kinect bundle at Gamestop

Purchasing the 4 gig Kinect/Kinect Adventures Xbox 360 bundle will run you about $300 no matter where you buy it, but only at Gamestop will purchasing one also net you a $50 gift card, which can then be spent on most of a new game, or 10 to 20 used Barbie and/or horse-related DS titles.
Xbox 360 4GB Console with Kinect with $50 GameStop Gift Card ($299.99, Gamestop)

, , , , , ,

2 Comments

Super Mario Marathon 5 raises over $43k for Child’s Play (and counting)

Super Mario Marathon 5 is streaming live from a Mario-themed living room in Indiana, where a group of gamers are playing select levels from a variety of Mario games. The levels they play are determined by the amount of money donated, with 800 total levels across ten Mario games available for them to complete.

Donated money goes directly to the Child’s Play foundation, which aims to improve “the lives of children with toys and games in [its] network of over 70 hospitals worldwide.” Last year’s event raised over $112k in donations to the foundation. Donations can be made here, and the stream can be viewed on the Mario Marathon site.

[Thanks, Stefan!]

, , ,

Leave a comment

It Costs Just $1.36 to Charge an iPad Each Year – iPhone Even Cheaper

NEW YORK (AP) — That coffee you’re drinking while gazing at your iPad? It cost more than all the electricity needed to run those games, emails, videos and news stories for a year.

The annual cost to charge an iPad is just $1.36, according to the Electric Power Research Institute, a non-profit research and development group funded by electric utilities.

By comparison, a 60-watt compact fluorescent bulb costs $1.61, a desktop PC adds up to $28.21 and a refrigerator runs you $65.72.

The group, known as EPRI, studied the power consumption of Apple Inc.’s iPad to determine the effect that the newly-popular devices might have on the nation’s electricity use.

The answer: not much.

If the number of iPads triples from the current 67 million, they would need the electricity from one small power plant operating at full strength.

But if people are using iPads instead of televisions to play video games, or ditching their desktop computers for iPads, the shift to tablets could mean lower overall power consumption. A desktop computer uses 20 times more power than an iPad.

Baskar Vairmohan, the EPRI researcher who conducted the iPad test, said the group is now studying usage to understand whether the explosion of tablets is adding to power consumption, or reducing it.

Residential power demand is on track to fall for the third straight year, according to the government. A weak economy is keeping people in smaller houses and shacked up with others. At the same time, efficiency programs are pushing more efficient light bulbs, air conditioners and other devices into homes. Refrigerators use a quarter of the power they used a generation ago, according to EPRI.

For the iPad test, Vairmohan measured the amount of power used to charge up an iPad with a drained battery. He assumed that users would charge up every other day. Over a year, the latest version of the iPad consumed 11.86 kilowatt-hours of electricity. (Older versions consume somewhat less power.)

The juice would cost $1.36 at the U.S. average residential price of 11.49 cents per kilowatt-hour.

But there’s an even cheaper way to go than the iPad. EPRI calculated the cost of power needed to fuel an iPhone 4 for year: just 38 cents.

By JONATHAN FAHEY

,

Leave a comment

HP may cut up to 1,000 jobs in Germany: magazine

Hewlett Packard, the world’s largest personal computer maker, may cut as many as 1,000 jobs in Germany as part of planned European-wide redundancies, WirtschaftsWoche reported, citing an unnamed staff representative.

HP is planning to cut about 8,000 positions in Europe by the end of 2014, the German magazine said, citing unnamed officials close to the company.

“As many as 1,000 jobs (in Germany) are acutely endangered,” WirtschaftsWoche quoted the labor representative as saying.

HP, which employs more than 300,000 workers globally, said in May the layoff of 27,000 workers, or 8 percent of its workforce, would be made mainly through early retirement and generate annual savings of $3.0-$3.5 billion as it exits its 2013/14 year.

HP, which posted a second-quarter profit above market estimates, aims to use cost savings from planned job cuts to drive organic growth.

HP in Germany was not available to comment.

, ,

Leave a comment

Judge blocks Apple in Google smartphone war

A U.S. judge on Friday ruled that Apple Inc cannot pursue an injunction against Google’s Motorola Mobility unit, effectively ending a key case for the iPhone maker in the smartphone patent wars.

The ruling came from Judge Richard Posner in Chicago federal court. He dismissed the litigation between Apple and Motorola Mobility with prejudice, meaning it can’t be refiled.

The ruling is a blow for Apple, which had hoped a decisive ruling against Motorola would help it gain an upper hand in the smartphone market against Android.

“Apple is complaining that Motorola’s phones as a whole ripped off the iPhone as a whole,” Posner wrote. “But Motorola’s desire to sell products that compete with the iPhone is a separate harm -— and a perfectly legal one -— from any harm caused by patent infringement.”

Apple spokeswoman Kristin Huguet declined to comment on the ruling. Motorola Mobility spokeswoman Jennifer Erickson said the company was pleased that Posner dismissed Apple’s case.

Both parties have the option to appeal Posner’s ruling.

Motorola sued Apple in October 2010, a move that was widely seen as a pre-emptive strike against an imminent Apple lawsuit. Apple filed its own claims against Motorola the same month.

Posner issued a series of pre-trial rulings that eliminated nearly all of Motorola’s patent claims against Apple from the prospective trial, while maintaining more of Apple’s claims against Motorola. That meant Apple had more to gain in the trial, which had been set to start last week.

However, Posner canceled the trial earlier this month.

Apple had sought an injunction barring the sale of Motorola products using Apple’s patented technology. But in Friday’s ruling, Posner wrote that neither party is entitled to an injunction.

Since Motorola could design around the minor technological features covered by Apple’s patents, an injunction would be an inappropriate windfall for Apple, Posner wrote.

Posner also said that Apple had not clearly demonstrated that Motorola phones caused a loss of consumer goodwill significant enough for an injunction.

“To suggest that it has suffered loss of market share, brand recognition, or customer goodwill as a result of Motorola’s alleged infringement of the patent claims still in play in this case is wild conjecture,” Posner wrote.

In a bright spot for the iPhone maker, Posner also ruled that Motorola could not seek an injunction based on the one patent in the case that it was still asserting against Apple.

Motorola had pledged to license that patent – which covers an aspect of wireless communication – on fair and reasonable terms to other companies in exchange for having the technology adopted as an industry standard.

“How could it be permitted to enjoin Apple from using an invention that it contends Apple must use if it wants to make a cell phone,” Posner wrote.

At a hearing earlier this week, Apple had argued that it would be satisfied with an injunction forcing Motorola to remove Apple’s patented features within three months. But Posner found that proposal unworkable, in part because of the hardship in administering such an order.

“Because of the potential costs to Motorola and the federal judiciary I could not responsibly order injunctive relief in favor of Apple,” he wrote in his ruling.

The case is Apple Inc. and NeXT Software Inc. V. Motorola Inc. and Motorola Mobility Inc., in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, no. 11-08540.

,

Leave a comment

Facebook expands ad business to Zynga’s website

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Facebook Inc has begun showing ads on Zynga Inc’s website, the first time the company has distributed ads beyond the borders of its own website and raising the possibility that Facebook could eventually launch an online advertising network.

“People may now see ads and sponsored stories from Facebook on Zynga.com,” said Facebook spokesperson Tucker Bounds. He said that Facebook does not share information about people or advertisers with Zynga, and that Facebook’s advertisers do not have any new “targeting criteria.”

Asked if Facebook was planning to create a full-fledged online ad network that distributes ads on other sites, Bounds said “we are only showing ads on Zynga right now.”

Zynga was not immediately available for comment.

Shares of Facebook, the world’s No.1 social network, were up 4.4 percent to $33.25 in mid-afternoon trading on Friday.

Facebook’s stock has been under pressure since its initial public offering last month, due in part to concerns about the company’s slowing revenue growth.

Facebook made most of its $3.7 billion in revenue last year from ads that appear on its site.

An ad network could significantly increase the reach of Facebook ads, offering an important new source of revenue growth.

, ,

Leave a comment